Specialists in Vintage and Celtic Inspired Bridal Wear

Measurements

The objective of this page is to explain the different measurements we require in order that we can produce the 'toile' or 'mock-up' of your wedding gown. It is extremely important that we receive as accurate a series of measurements as possible to ensure that your 'toile' will fit you correctly.

We would recommend that if possible you should ask a professional seamstress to take your measurements.

Measurements can be in inches or centimeters, but please make sure you indicate which is used.

Chest: Place the end of your measuring tape above your bust, continuing around under your arm pit, across your back, under the other arm pit, and ending in the front where your measurement began.

Bust: Measure around the widest part of back, straight across the fullest part of the bust, not under the bust line. Be aware that wearing no bra rather than a strapless or regular bra can make quite a difference in measurements. Plus, note that "the time of the month" measurements are taken can cause bust line measurements to fluctuate.

Waist: Measure around your natural waistline without holding your stomach in. Leave one finger under the measuring tape so that the tape can be moved so that we do not have too tight a waistline.

Hips: Stand with your feet together and measure around the fullest part of the hip. Put your thumbs at your natural waist and rest your hands on your hips. The tip of your fingers should be at the area to measure your hips.

Nape of Neck to Waist: Measure from the centre of the back of your neck (where you would expect a small collar to sit), down to the centre of your waist (see above).

Waist to Floor: Stand with your feet together and measure from your waist to the floor. If at all possible, try to wear shoes which will be the same height as your wedding shoes. The final dress may be able to be 'taken up', but this may be a problem if the dress has an embroidered hem.

Cross Back Measurement: With your arms by your side, measure from the crease of one arm pit, across the back to the other crease. We find that a good way to do this is to place a pencil under each arm pit and measure from one to the other

Arm Lengtht: for some dresses we may require the length of the arm in order to fit the sleeve correctly. If so, the measurement required is from the shoulder bone (normally where the seam of a jacket would be), down to the nuckles on the hand.